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RealService is delighted to announce that our Founder, Howard Morgan, has been conferred with the title of Honorary Professor at the Bartlett School of Sustainable Construction at University College London (UCL).

Picture of Howard Morgan
Howard Morgan, Founder, Real Service

The appointment recognises Howard’s pioneering work in the field of customer experience and real estate over the past 30 years.

The Bartlett School of Sustainable Construction is an international centre of excellence in the teaching and research of project management, real estate and economics.

Speaking about the appointment, Howard said

“I’m very proud to receive this honour and looking forward to contributing to the development of this new field of real estate education and research.

The real estate industry will need to develop new skills and to attract a far more diverse pool of talent if we are to respond to the challenges imposed by pandemic and climate change. I’m excited to be working with an internationally recognised School which can bring fresh thinking to this challenge.”

Howard’s appointment builds on his role as course co-director with Professor Yolande Barnes to launch the ‘CX and Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme‘ at the Bartlett Real Estate Institute (BREI).

Professor Yolande Barnes said

“I’m delighted that Howard’s real-world expertise in this critically important area of real estate will be available to our students at the Bartlett.”

Howard will continue to provide advice on customer experience strategy to RealService clients who include leading investment managers, real estate investment trusts, landed estates, professional firms and professional bodies.

 

For more information contact:

howard.morgan@real-service.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RealService Founder, Howard Morgan, recently spoke at the Navigator Forum organised by our strategic partner, CGA 

Our collaboration with CGA is enabling us to provide the best of both worlds to our clients: customer insight, CX consulting, training and benchmarks from within and outside the real estate industry.

A report of his presentation is available here and reprinted below with thanks to Chris Garthwaite and Carla Hall at CGA for the invitation.

www.cgaexperience.com

 

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Introduction

Cities around the world have seen a fundamental change in the way we use property and real estate. As with many of the seismic shifts since March 2020, this was a trend that was already in motion pre-pandemic, but Covid-19 has escalated the evolutionary process.

While change presents challenges for commercial property owners and those in businesses that hinge on real estate (not least UK pensions, which are underpinned by property), it also presents opportunities as well. So, how can businesses adapt their thinking to create a customer experience worth paying for in 2022 and beyond?

What’s changed in real estate?

The overarching change is that we simply are not using commercial property in the way we were five years ago. Remote working is perhaps the most obvious change that has occurred, with digitisation opening opportunities for people to live and work beyond the overpopulated and highly priced realms of major cities.

Remote working was a creeping trend that has leapt forwards, with many wishing to continue working from home all or part of the time going forward. It opens all kinds of opportunities, ranging from ‘levelling up’ income and local spending across the UK to providing more job opportunities for anyone who can’t travel into the likes of London and Manchester on a regular basis.

While there may be some friction between businesses and employees as to how the remote working model plays out in the long-term, as of September 2021 50% of British employees are still working from home at least some of the time. That’s up from 37% before the pandemic. The change has prompted technology to advance in order to improve the remote working experience. Last month alone we saw Facebook showcase their haptic glove prototype, allowing you to feel objects in virtual reality.

It’s not just offices, however, that are seeing changes. The high street has been under ‘threat’ since the dawn of the internet, and the challenges of the last two years have meant that anyone who hadn’t changed their shopping habits to the digital realm has now been largely forced to. As a result, shopping centres and brick-and-mortar stores are suffering.

Even rented housing and apartment buildings are facing enormous change in cities (linked back to remote working). As people realise that they are not bound to urban areas, landlords find themselves competing for tenants in a way they have never had to before.

We are at a moment of profound change and for lots of businesses that’s a daunting prospect, but it’s not a situation that has never occurred before. For example, one might see both an industry and society parallel in the colliery closures and ensuing miners strikes in the 1980s. They, too, were a way of life, impacted entire communities, were linked to the very essence of how the country was run, and had the capacity to make entire businesses irrelevant in a very short space of time.

Reimagining the proposition for commercial property

Against this backdrop we need to change the way we think about commercial property. What is it for? How is it used?

Since 2002 Barclays has been selling off its office buildings and leasing them back. Large city apartment buildings have been plagued by scandal and a loss of trust post Grenfell, and shopping centres are floundering. For example, Bluewater’s 30% stakeholder, Landsec, is currently in talks to buy Lendlease’s 25% stake for £200m. That would represent an overall value drop of around £800m over the past three years.

That said, we are seeing a repurposing of those buildings and the way they’re used for work, life and leisure. What businesses need to think about is how to provide services that enhance experience in these environments.

Space as a service

In offices, stats show that typically just 2 out of 10 corporates are satisfied with the services they get from landlords. So, the old is being outshone by the new, as ‘space as a service’ providers like WeWork capture the mood and gain 9 or 10 out of 10 in customer satisfaction surveys.

The shift in our approach to commercial property comes down to two things: service and experience. Office and apartment buildings are shifting from a focus on ownership to the monetisation of services. That includes physical space as something people consume according to need. That might be in the likes of WeWork or student accommodation providers like Unite Students. These are no longer places to simply crash for the night, they provide tea, coffee and services that enhance the experience.

The tenant as the customer

In apartment buildings, landlords are being called out for abusing power (only recently, Luke Johnson wrote his piece ‘Time to end the abuse of tenants’ for The Times). There’s also a rise in pressure groups like Guardians of the Arches, calling for tenants to be treated as valued customers.

One example that Howard highlighted, was from Quintain Living. Their lifestyle focussed rental company has been developing an area outside Wembley, producing something colourful, imaginative and experience focused. It includes a rooftop community space on the 14-storey residential tower, as well as two floors of office space which tenants can use free of charge. What they’re delivering as a result is not just a roof over your head, but a community that’s nice to live in. There are camper vans on the roof, which can be offices for the day, colourful post boxes and hot tubs – the emphasis is on the experience.

In many ways this is forward thinking. However, one contributor pointed out that in other ways, this emphasis on community is a throwback to the way continental Europe structured its communities in the past, with commercial premises on one floor and housing on another. There is inspiration to be drawn from the past as well as imagining the future.

Training and behaviour

The missing link between reimagining the way we use commercial property and executing those plans successfully is a combination of skills and strategic capabilities.

A mindset change

In the first instance, it’s about a mindset change. For a long time, those who have owned or managed property, have had the luxury of not really thinking about the customer and their experience. Property has been in demand, so landlords have been able to command high fees without providing any service. Now, commercial property owners find themselves in a position where it needs to give people a reason to come to them – they need to think about the customer experience.

It’s a way of thinking that the hospitality industry has understood for generations. CGA’s Graham Ryan recalled living in an apartment building in the USA, where the concierge added enormous value to each tenant by knowing everyone’s name, always saying ‘hello’, and being engaging. The community loved him, and 26 years later, he remains a positive memory of that experience. That individual and his customer service created value for that asset.

It is a mindset that forward thinking businesses are seeing tangible benefits from across the board. For example, researcher Dr Danielle Sanderson investigated the determinants of satisfaction amongst tenants of UK offices. She found that if you can increase satisfaction by one unit on a 1 to 5 scale, you can increase total returns by +1.9%.

New skills and training

For many businesses this will require a change of perspective, but ultimately that’s driven by introducing different skillsets at a top level, and training to make sure that those values are then reflected through the different customer touch points in the business.

A contributor noted that it’s essential for teams as well as leadership to be inspired to this new way of thinking. She said that staff need to be taken on the same journey as leaders through appropriate training and mentoring. It was felt that if teams are not involved in that transformative process towards customer experience, then they will naturally pivot back to what they know.

It was highlighted that traditionally, the recruitment process into the property industry has focused on chartered surveyors, but those qualifications and courses don’t cover customer service or customer experience. They are transactional. Unless those individuals are naturally inclined to service, they won’t have the necessary skills to address customer experience. They must be generated, taught and trained.

With that in mind, we are now seeing more and more jobs available for a Head of Customer Experience, and training providers are catching on. For example, UCL has launched a short course titled CX in Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme.

One contributor, whose company is in property investment, said that they have moved from a one size fits all approach to a one size fits one experience approach. They have pivoted the business so that everything is consumer centric. Where a landlord might have traditionally only had contact with a tenant when a three-year tenancy agreement came up for renewal, there’s now a property management layer that’s about knowing the customer and ensuring they want to stay. The question they ask themselves is ‘how can we be Ritz Carlton for living, office space and logistics?’ The Ritz Carlton has its own centre of excellence, so they are creating a similar capacity in-house to ensure staff training.

The gap in strategic capabilities

In addition to training, there’s the question of what a more experience focused approach to the property industry looks like and what businesses need to factor into their budgets and capabilities to make that happen.

Pastries and ice creams

One contributor works with a landlord who had worried: ‘We can’t supply enough milk to our office building!’ It’s a new issue for landlords, but as they are now providing tea and coffee making facilities, the logistics around milk and how much they needed becomes something to think about. The same landlord had questions about their Danish pastries – were they too big? Should they be providing them at all?

Whether it’s pastries or luxury toiletries, in many ways such an issue seems trivial, but when it’s done to scale it is both a budgetary and logistics consideration, the likes of which hoteliers and brand consultants have been thinking about for decades. There’s a need to decide what’s required, when, how much, how it’s being delivered, how waste and cleaning are to be managed. It’s also about measuring the impact of these small details on the customer experience so you know what to change, increase or decrease.

Historically, no budget would have been put aside for these experiential factors, even if the thought had been there to implement them. Now, the property industry needs to incorporate them into its thinking. The service charge system in the UK has meant that’s where the budget is set. Most properties have a budget line for letting but they don’t have a line item for customer retention.

One contributor remembered suggesting to the owner of an office building that they give ice creams to all the occupants if the air conditioning system went down. The response was ‘we don’t have the budget’. Today, new operators are coming into the market, and they are more attuned to a service-based way of thinking. In short, the pastries and ice creams are accounted for.

Marketing and measuring satisfaction

Even how we ‘purchase’ space is changing. Increasingly, online portals are playing a role in how we search the market for property. Outside property you can purchase in one or two clicks, but can’t with property – is that part of the future? At the moment, pricing isn’t dynamic either, but is that going to change? If we’re renting offices by the day, will we see surge pricing? Will there also be more TripAdvisor style review platforms for property?

What do each of these things mean for skillsets required within the property industry? What partnerships would create a competitive advantage?

The conversation raised several interesting avenues for exploration as well as exciting prospects for the future of the property industry. Key trends were identified including:

  • The rise of property management
  • The tenant as the customer
  • Space as a service

All of these warrant further exploration within themselves.

The speed of change in customer expectation is dramatic and the way in which customers are feeling and behaving when it comes to commercial property is entirely different to a few years ago. Is there enough industry awareness of that change, or is it just the enlightened few who are making a difference?

Howard concluded that as a mentor within the property industry, he often asks those who have newly completed their professional training, ‘have you thought about your tenants as customers?’ To date, no one has responded in the affirmative. It’s a skills gap and a huge opportunity – it’s just a question of harnessing it.

 

REALSERVICE are delighted to congratulate our senior consultant and adviser Dr Danielle Sanderson on her promotion to Associate Professor at UCL’s Bartlett School of Planning.

It was when researching her PhD that Dr Sanderson proved the link between occupier satisfaction and property performance. Her thesis demonstrated that if landlords could raise customer satisfaction levels by one point on a five-point scale they could enjoy an additional 1.9 per cent in total returns.

Her PhD research used anonymised data gathered from RealService studies and confidential financial results provided by property companies keen to establish whether the link between customer experience and improved financial returns could be established.

Dr Sanderson then began a lecturing post at UCL but retained her links with RealService where she is our first port of call for advice on statistics and analysis. She is also a key contributor to the Customer Experience in Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme, which is run by Experience Makers and the Bartlett Real Estate Institute.

Howard Morgan, the founder and managing director of RealService, is also course co-director of the Future Leaders Programme.

“I am delighted for Danielle. RealService helped fund her doctoral thesis and she has continued her investigations into the return on investment in customer experience by landlords and property managers.

This is a topic very close to our hearts and it’s an honour to have played a part in her journey towards this prestigious promotion.”

For more information about Danielle’s role and research at the Bartlett School of Planning please see here.

For information on the Customer Experience in Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme, please contact Danielle@Experiencemakers.com.

WE are very proud to present our latest innovation; ladies and gentlemen, clients and friends (cue fanfare), this is the brand new RealService Dashboard.

Created over the last 12 months from a RealService brief by Jon Saville, of our tech partners at Walnut Innovation Limited, and our own data supremo Lasha Gegidze, this live reporting tool will make it possible for our clients to analyse their data in real time and in more segments than a chocolate orange.

“It’s a brilliant, new versatile tool which will bring up-to-date statistics and customer insight to our clients,” said RealService director and chief operating officer Louise Freethy.

It’s especially useful for clients with diverse portfolios who might want to monitor trends by country, or by sector and it provides both the macro and the micro view. Want to know your NPS score over the last five years? It’s all there. Want to know what a specific occupier said in response to a specific question in a specific building in Poland? That insight is there too, in Polish and English, at the click of a button.

Lasha Gegidze … RealService data supremo

Daily refresher dynamic

“It has a daily refresher dynamic, it looks modern and enticing and the information is easily navigable,” said Lasha. “Clients can add new pages so it’s bespoke to them and the data is sliceable and diceable in every way.”

While RealService was the driving force behind the brief, it was Jon Saville at Walnut who had the technical know-how to make it happen.

Based near Peterborough, Walnut have worked with RealService for around 10 years.

It started with our Quest system, the cloud-based client portal which securely stores the transcripts from the thousands of interviews RealService conduct every year.

Jon Saville … dashboard designer

“We were given the opportunity to redevelop the Quest system, which was a substantial piece of work – in fact, it took two years,” said Jon.

Focused on the needs of clients

“This dashboard is similar and it has been an interesting journey. RealService are completely focused on the needs of their clients and they want to deliver the best service. It’s our job to give them that support.”

Jon sees the dashboard as a real value-add.

“It is completely integrated into the Quest platform so any data put into Quest is reflected on the dashboard.

“The other advantage is that all you need is a web browser or mobile phone in order to see it. It has been designed so there is the least amount of ‘friction’ between the data and the user.

See at a glance and track trends

“The immediacy in the way the information is presented means you can see at a glance what it’s trying to say and track the trends. It’s pretty much piped into your eyeballs!”

If you are thinking of conducting Voice of Customer research and would like to hear more about the dashboard and our other services, please contact Louise Freethy, our chief operating officer, at the email address below.

Louise Freethy can be contacted at: Louise.freethy@real-service.co.uk.

Walnut Innovation can be contacted via www.walnutinnovation.co.uk.

THIS is the second interview in our series of CX Conversations and it’s with Kaj Bakker, the head of sustainability (Europe) for global REIT Cromwell Property Group.

Kaj is a passionate convert to the importance of customer experience in the property industry and talks about how annual feedback gathered by RealService across the continent has enabled Cromwell to better understand their occupiers.

Kaj Bakker
Kaj Bakker, Head of Sustainability (Europe), at Cromwell Property Group

He also touches on being the middle-man, the asset manager serving two masters – occupiers and investors. It’s understanding occupiers, he says, which will drive retention, reputation and revenue – and keep investors happy.

Next time, David O’Sullivan, director of occupier and property services at Great Portland Estates, emphasises the importance of customer feedback and how ‘over communicating’ during the pandemic has forged closer relationships between landlord and occupiers.

Welcome to our series of CX Conversations.

If you are a property company unconvinced as to the value of customer experience, please listen to our series of interviews with key figures from different sectors. We’ll be posting over the coming weeks and our interviewees include:

  • THE CUSTOMER. The head of real estate for PwC speaks stridently about the levels of service and engagement he expects as a major customer and he offers up a future of the office as ‘business theatre’.
  • THE ASSET MANAGER. The head of sustainability, Europe, for a global REIT talks about the importance of retention and reputation as key drivers for revenue.
  • THE LANDLORD. The director of occupier & property services for a major UK landlord explains the value of communicating with customers and how building relationships will serve them well in what are likely to be tough times following the pandemic.
Chris Richmond

1. The customer

This first interview is with Chris Richmond, senior head of real estate for PwC.

We asked him about the services he expects as an occupier, the role of managing agents and their preparedness for post-pandemic office life. Oh, and we also touched on the future of the office itself.

Next time, Kaj Bakker, head of sustainability (Europe) at Cromwell Property Group, will talk about being the middle-man, the asset manager serving two masters – occupiers and investors. It’s understanding occupiers, he says, which will drive retention, reputation and revenue.

PROPERTY management and customer experience will be key to the future value of real estate, said Professor Yolande Barnes, chair of UCL’s Bartlett Real Estate Institute, at a British Property Federation webinar focusing on tackling the property industry’s skills gap.

Speakers at the event also included RealService founder and managing director Howard Morgan and Experience Makers producer Harriet Jones.

“The things that make real estate valuable are the people and what they do in the space,” Prof Barnes said. “There was a weird time in the 20th Century when money was made through inflation and the value-adders were those who could trade property at rising prices.

“However, the closed club of big-building real estate is dismantling. Upward-only rent reviews won’t be what creates value in the future, it will be the long-term performance and management of the building.

‘Property managers have come from central casting’

“It’s about the income which can be generated from the people in the building and that puts property management and customer experience front and centre.”

However, according to a report for the British Council for Offices, written and researched by customer experience consultants RealService, the industry is not blessed with a customer-centric culture and those who have been employed in customer-facing roles have come largely from outside the sector.

“Property managers often look as though they have come from central casting,” said Howard Morgan, the author of the BCO report. “We found there is nothing in the major real estate universities or in the APC process which emphasises the importance of customer experience. People are graduating without an understanding of who their customers are.”

In an effort to transform real estate and provide training to ambitious young property professionals, BREI has teamed up with Experience Makers to launch an executive short course – CX in Real Estate:  Future Leaders Programme. The course directors are Prof Barnes and Howard Morgan.

Experience Makers is a research, education and networking community which aims to put ‘life and soul into property’ and has a number of major landlords among its members. Many have contributed to the course content and endorsed it as a much-needed game-changer for the industry.

“There should be alarm bells ringing because landlords need to future-proof against what’s going to be a major change in the office sector and the impact of the internet on the retail sector,” said Harriet Jones.

“Customer experience is not just about making sure there’s a smile at the front desk, it’s about designing all your strategies around the customer and developing those processes. It is beginning to happen, and Experience Makers members can vouch for that, but it’s not happening quickly.

“The Future Leaders Programme is calling for pioneers to come and challenge the system, challenge RICS and change the language and processes of real estate.”

Other areas covered by the panel included the lack of diversity in the industry and discussion around how young people from different backgrounds could be attracted into property management.

The CX in Real Estate: Future Leaders Programme aims to address many of these shortcomings and will be run over five sessions, starting on May 6. Core to the course will be modules on customer experience strategy and design.

For more information on the Future Leaders Programme, please contact harriet@experiencemakers.com

To see the BCO report please head here

For the full BPF webinar please click here

A VITAL cog in the RealService business is the in-house research team.

These skilled researchers conduct the interviews which give RealService clients the in-depth feedback upon which they base key business decisions.

Many of the interviewers have worked for RealService for many years, returning to projects they know intimately on an annual basis. Others have backgrounds in languages, which enables the company to carry out research in the native tongues of customers all over Europe and beyond. For the Cromwell Property Group, for example, interviewers operate in French, Dutch, Italian, Danish, Finnish, and German.

This week, director and chief operating officer Louise Freethy registered her thanks to the team who have brought invaluable insight to RealService clients over the past 22 years, with a special emphasis on research carried out during the pandemic which, she said, has helped clients sketch out “the new normal”.

“Our research team are the unsung heroes of our business,” she said.

“They are practised in gaining invaluable information which can be analysed and presented to our clients. This has been true since RealService was founded in 1999, but especially over the last months where the real estate industry has been hungry for  intelligence around what they can expect the world to look like post pandemic.

Vast knowledge of the property industry

“We are not a market research company. We are a company with vast knowledge of the property industry and the insight our interviewers glean is used by our clients to inform their strategic business decisions.

“Major property companies will be establishing their post-pandemic offerings based on the findings of our research.

“The interviewers have to be highly proficient. They have to engage busy people in a conversation which will provide important feedback on specific questions, and, most importantly, they provide an independent voice.

“We rely on them and I wanted to take an opportunity to thank them for their work.”

So, what makes a great interview?

“A great interview is a conversation which is directed by the interviewer to cover specific points,” said April Davies, who has been with RealService for 12 years and whose projects have included Cadogan, Great Portland Estates, The Crown Estate and others.

April Davies … skilled interviewer

“We are often interviewing very busy people so we need to engage with them very quickly and convince them of the value of taking part in the research.

“It is about covering all the bases in the questionnaire and providing real-life examples, so when our client reads the transcript they know exactly why their customer thinks they are doing a good – or bad – job and what they can do to improve.”

The value of RealService feedback is described as “crucial” by David O’Sullivan, Director of Occupier and Property Services at Great Portland Estates.

“The feedback from the RealService surveys is not just important, it’s crucial, critical,” he said.

‘The feedback loop is essential’

“The feedback loop is essential and it’s one of the reasons we moved our survey from a biennial event to an annual one. Two years is too long to go without talking with your customers.

“To the question, what do we do with that research, the answer is we create action plans from the feedback.”

Before the start of each project, the interviewing team is briefed by the project manager. All have been trained around issues such as confidentiality and data protection. Last month, all undertook  Interviewer Refresher Training.

“We believe our research team is our point of difference,” said Louise Freethy.

“We do not contract out our interviewing to a call centre. We use an experienced, in-house team who are a key component of our business.

“They go above and beyond when interviewing to provide the sort of insight which allows RealService to go above and beyond for our clients.”

RealService, Founder & MD, Howard Morgan will chair a webinar in the British Property Federation’s ‘MyBPF – Digital Series’ on 29th March. He’ll be exploring the customer experience skills gap and how we can ensure our industry has the right skills for the future. Full details and sign up here

https://bpf.org.uk/events/property-s-got-talent-new-skills-required-for-a-post-pandemic-world/

Nurturing a diverse and skilled workforce is a key element of the BPF Redefining Real Estate long-term agenda for change.

Pre-pandemic research by RealService for British Council for Offices (BCO) identified that “the disruptive forces reshaping the way we work call for an equally disruptive response in the way we serve our customers” and that “there is a wide and increasing skills gap in both the quality and quantity of talent able to deliver the customer experience expected by occupiers” The Coronavirus Pandemic has widened the gap and called into question how we educate and recruit in the property industry.

This webinar will explore “What is the mindset and what are the skills that the property industry needs to nurture for the post pandemic world?”

Speakers include

Prof Yolande Barnes
Chair
Bartlett Real Estate Institute

James Ainsworth
Head of Estate Management
PwC UK

Lynne Keenan
Executive Director, Head of Scotland
MAPP

Harriet Jones
Producer
Experience Makers

 

Announcing a new strategic partnership between RealService and CGA to support the drive for change in the real estate industry

REALSERVICE is delighted to announce an exciting new collaboration which will bring even more insight and opportunities to our clients as they revitalise following the pandemic.

We are teaming up with customer-experience consultancy CGA to provide clients with the best of both worlds: RealService’s renowned expertise within the property industry plus CGA’s insight from other sectors.

Howard Morgan, the founder and MD of RealService, said: “This is a crucial time for the property industry and we believe it needs the best thinking from both within and outside its boundaries.

“The industry is looking for radical thinking to help it quickly reposition and rethink its products and services.

“With CGA we believe we have found a partner with a similar real-world outlook and new tools, such as Heartbeat®, which will enable our clients to monitor customer experience with even more precision.

‘A great fit’

“We are a great fit in terms of culture and believe this will put us in an even stronger position to support our clients’ ambitions to become even more customer-centric.

“By speaking the language of customer experience and of real estate, we can offer our clients a fully integrated service covering customer insight, change-management consulting, performance measurement and training.”

RealService clients cover all sectors of the property industry and include The Crown Estate, Cromwell Property Group, Schroders and Great Portland Estates.

Chris Garthwaite, the CEO and founder of CGA, said: “The timing is right for the property industry to think in a radically different way about its customer relationships.

Thinking in a different way

“The industry is realising it must engage in a different way. It is finally thinking about the practical and emotional experience that the end user and business customer wants today and will expect in the post-pandemic world.

“It can learn a lot from the way that other industries are responding and changing their products and services.

“Bringing Howard and his team’s deep knowledge of real estate and customer experience together with our outside-in perspective from 20 years of working with blue-chip clients across the world like Coca-Cola European Partners, The Telegraph, Renault, and many more, is I believe a compelling proposition.”

RealService and CGA have already combined with great success on a project for Transport for London.

Dan Lovatt, head of property management and head of build to rent at TfL, said: “We have enjoyed working with both consultancies over the past year and the collaboration is exciting in that it gives clients like us access to fresh thinking about customer experience from within and outside the property sector.”

For more information please contact Howard Morgan at Howard.Morgan@real-service.co.uk or see the RealService website at www.real-service.com