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QUESTION. What do Singapore Airlines, the NHS and The Crown Estate have in common?

Answer. They all examine – and publish – their Net Promoter Scores.

The score is a measure of customer loyalty used by more than two-thirds of America’s Fortune 1,000 companies and which has been embraced in the UK by forward-thinking property companies like The Crown Estate and Great Portland Estates. Both are RealService clients and have published their latest scores in their 2021 Annual reports.

RealService can help you measure the loyalty of your customers and benchmark your score against your peers.

Managing director Howard Morgan believes the NPS is putting the spotlight on customer loyalty in the property industry: “The NPS is independent, it’s transparent and it is a powerful device for landlords in motivating their leadership teams and suppliers,” he said.

“It’s an industry-standard measure and I am delighted we are trusted by our clients to gather data which tracks and demonstrates their progress in improving customer loyalty.”

End user satisfaction more and more important

Investors are increasingly focusing on rental income and that makes the satisfaction of the end user more and more important. A good NPS is attractive to investors but it’s also an early-warning system which highlights areas which could be improved.

The score was developed in 1993 by Fred Reichheld and later adopted in 2003 by US consultants Bain & Company and tech company Satmetrix.

It is based around the simple question: On a scale of 0-10, how likely are you to recommend us to a friend or colleague? Plus the obvious follow up: Why?

The score identifies promoters, passives and detractors; it’s the promoters who will recommend your product or building to other potential customers.

As well as helping you calculate your NPS, RealService can also benchmark your score against other property companies, via our RealService Customer Experience Index.

RealService Customer Experience Index

The Index is based on around 35,000 responses to questions put to residential and commercial clients over the previous two years, covering eight core areas and incorporating overall Net Promoter Scores.

RealService clients can analyse their own data confidentially and compare their RealService CXI score with their peers in the property industry. It is published annually.

Louise Freethy, RealService director and chief operating officer, believes the property industry should embrace a metric which has long been used in other sectors.

“The NPS is a tried and tested tool which is an incredibly useful indicator for landlords as they reinvent office, retail and industrial environments and engage their customers in that process,” she said.

So please download our factsheet which covers NPS basics or contact RealService director and chief operating officer Louise.Freethy@Real-Service.co.uk for more information.

 

NPS Factsheet

THE Build To Rent industry is ready to embrace an accreditation system which would set standards and protect the sector from rogue operators.

At a virtual roundtable event chaired by RealService founder and managing director Howard Morgan, industry leaders discussed how Build To Rent (BTR) could continue to improve its offering to customers. In summary, the participants agreed it was time to begin an accreditation process which could define a set of standards, be a trusted guide for customers and provide a means of communicating performance to audiences such as investors – while still leaving room in the market for different offerings at different price points.

Attendees observed there was an emerging need. “We are approaching a period of development and maturity in the sector so things which might have seemed impossible three years ago are now within our grasp,” concluded UKAA chief executive Dave Butler.

Accreditation and data transparency

Participants explored whether an accreditation system should involve the release and sharing of underlying data between industry peers. The main conclusion among attendees was that the sharing of data was not an immediate priority – not yet, anyway – but there appeared to be consensus around the need for a set of minimum standards around what customers should expect.
The debate around data sharing centred on trust, the quality of the information and the method of harvesting it.

Katherine Rose, director of BTR & PRS at Navana Property Group, said: “Sharing data is important but I don’t think the industry is ready to do it yet. We’re all still a little precious and also, how accurate is that data? Everyone wants to look good and how truthful are they? I’m not sure everyone will play fairly. But it’s the way to go. We should all pull together and be less precious.”

Opportunities for Market Differentiation

PPP Capital’s Sanjeev Patel, managing director of LuxuryDigs, said: “I do believe there is a need for accreditation but I also believe there is a place in the market for a Premier Inn and a Waldorf.

“If you want a Waldorf, fantastic, pay for it. If you want a slightly cheaper product, go to a Holiday Inn or a Premier Inn and pay a bit less. They may be very different but in both you will get a clean room and a comfortable bed. I’m comfortable with everyone signing up to a minimum standard – a high minimum, mind you – then you can pitch your assets wherever you want them to be and marketing and customer expectations can be managed appropriately.”

Creating standards 

“I would draw an analogy with Wimbledon,” said, Howard Morgan.

“People had been hitting a ball around for a long time but had no ability to compare their skills with others until Wimbledon came along and defined a set of rules and how to score. I think there comes a point in an industry’s evolution when someone has to say it’s time to draw up some standards that we all abide by and, although it might not be comfortable for everyone, it seems that we are getting closer to that point.”

The group also heard from Chris Garthwaite, the chief executive of customer experience consultancy CGA, who worked with 26 different rail operators to define a set of common standards.

‘Accreditation builds trust’

Having an accreditation system, he said, would build trust and help re-set expectations.

“Trust is a key differentiator; if you lose trust, you lose loyalty. In a world which is accelerating, becoming more digital but where you have a fragmentation of customers, understanding the emotion and sentiment of your customers will become fundamental to delivering the value of the brand – or the industry – to those audiences.”

There is already an accreditation system in the student accommodation sector and according to Jane Couch, chief operating officer of Fresh Property Group, while this is an extra cost – around £2-3 per student – this extra spend actually helps attract investors.

“Investors are traditionally risk-averse but they know about the accreditation costs up front and it means they know you are a responsible operator who is not going to have problems with negative feedback hitting the press.”

Prospects and next steps

Dave Butler said there was already a UKAA benchmarking group working together to deliver a manifesto around what ‘good’ looks like and he issued a call for anybody who wants to contribute to that debate.
“While I’m not going to die in a ditch over the sharing of data – I think that’s a while down the road – it is hugely important to define ‘good’,” he said.

Read the article on the UKAA website here

Welcome to our series of CX Conversations.

If you are a property company unconvinced as to the value of customer experience, please listen to our series of interviews with key figures from different sectors. We’ll be posting over the coming weeks and our interviewees include:

  • THE CUSTOMER. The head of real estate for PwC speaks stridently about the levels of service and engagement he expects as a major customer and he offers up a future of the office as ‘business theatre’.
  • THE ASSET MANAGER. The head of sustainability, Europe, for a global REIT talks about the importance of retention and reputation as key drivers for revenue.
  • THE LANDLORD. The director of occupier & property services for a major UK landlord explains the value of communicating with customers and how building relationships will serve them well in what are likely to be tough times following the pandemic.
Chris Richmond

1. The customer

This first interview is with Chris Richmond, senior head of real estate for PwC.

We asked him about the services he expects as an occupier, the role of managing agents and their preparedness for post-pandemic office life. Oh, and we also touched on the future of the office itself.

Next time, Kaj Bakker, head of sustainability (Europe) at Cromwell Property Group, will talk about being the middle-man, the asset manager serving two masters – occupiers and investors. It’s understanding occupiers, he says, which will drive retention, reputation and revenue.

RealService, founder & MD, Howard Morgan, has been appointed joint course director for the new CX in Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme launched by Experience Makers and the Bartlett Real Estate Institute .

Experience Makers is the real estate industry champion for customer experience professional training and research. The Bartlett Real Estate Institute (BREI) is part of University College London’s world-class faculty and the focal point for all built-environment professionals to re-think real estate.

The CX in Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme is the first short course of its kind to combine academic research with industry insight to provide a vital understanding of customer experience strategy in property, and the skills to implement it.

This exciting initiative is the culmination of research and consultation carried out by Experience Makers and partners that highlights an alarming gap between current training and the skills required for a fast evolving and increasingly service-driven industry.

The impact of coronavirus has plainly revealed the property industry’s reliance on its customers. The call for new and improved knowledge on how to create attractive and healthy places that respond to customer need has only increased.

Fellow course director Prof. Yolande Barnes, chair of the Bartlett Real Estate Institute, said: “This new short course is an exciting next step in our journey to explore the richness and diversity of the value that real estate generates.

 “The programme sets out to open minds to new ways of thinking about real estate in the Covid-19 era and will equip students with practical tools to put this into action. Our ambition is to foster a new generation of professionals who see real estate not as a commodity, but as means to deliver an outstanding experience to customers.”

The CX in Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme is aimed at ambitious individuals working in all areas of property and its related fields, who recognise that real estate has evolved and who see themselves leading CX programmes at asset, team or business level.

Initially delivered online via eight units over six weeks, the intensive short course provides participants with a rewarding learning experience, equips them with practical tools to take back to their business and offers the chance to be part of a new alumni of property professionals with a customer mindset.

The CX in Real Estate – Future Leaders Programme is supported by Experience Makers members and developed in consultation with an Advisory Group of leading organisations passionate about pushing the industry forward.

These include The Crown Estate, Get Living, MAPP, Savills and Transport for London. Their involvement ensures that the programme is rooted in real-world aims, actions and successes.

Howard Morgan, said: “RealService was founded 20 years ago with the ambition to transform our industry’s approach to customer relationships. RealService is a proud supporter of Experience Makers with it’s mission to champion education and research in customer experience in real estate. I am thrilled to be collaborating with Professor Yolande Barnes and UCL Bartlett, an academic partner that shares our ambition to rethink real estate.

 “I believe that this programme is an international first and am excited to welcome participants from the UK, Europe and the rest of the world.

 

Following the success of the first programme held in June the next programme will start in November 2021. Information about the next course is available here:

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/bartlett/real-estate/study/short-courses/cx-real-estate-future-leaders-programme-short-course

 

 


 

 

About BREI (+ UCL press office number +44 (0)7747 565 056)

 

The Bartlett Real Estate Institute is a new global institute that is rethinking the traditional view of real estate. We offer MSc programmes, short courses and research opportunities that critically evaluate real estate within its wider societal, economic and environmental context.

 

About Experience Makers www.experiencemakers.com

 

Experience Makers are the real estate industry champions for customer experience professional education and research supported by a network of leading organisations and trailblazing individuals committed to pushing the industry forward.

 

02/08/2021

IT’S the ski season, or it would be in normal circumstances.

But is your business enjoying a view from the top of the mountain, or in danger of sliding down the icy slopes?

Even in the property industry your customers are your most important assets; treating them well will help with your retention, your reputation and, vitally, your revenue.

So, how well do you know your customers?

Take our fun quiz and let’s see how you’d go on the customer-experience slopes. Are you ready for the black runs? Or stuck in ski school?

 

YES!

5pts

Hmm

3pts

NO!

0pts

Your website and published documents refer to ‘customers’, not ‘tenants’
Your staff refer to your customers as ‘customers’ not ‘tenants’
Your mission statement refers to your customers
You have a senior manager with a customer experience remit
Staff training includes sessions in customer experience
You know what your customers think of you
You regularly survey your customers internally
You regularly have an independent body survey your customers
TOTAL

 

35-40 points

You’re sitting back in the ski lodge, sipping a vin rouge enjoying the view. The Ski Sunday music is playing in the background. Well done! You are very aware of the importance of your customers, they have told you what they need and you are making every effort to meet their expectations. However, you also know that there are icy patches on the run home so you might need our expertise to keep you ahead of the game.

Contact us and we can help you devise a CX strategy which will enable you to make customer experience your point of difference.

 

20-35 points

You’ve mastered the snow-plough and the beginners’ slopes but you have loftier ambitions. You are aware that you need to get closer to your customers but you’re not quite ready to point your skis downhill and go for it. You need a good instructor to get you past the basics.

We can help you move onto the red and black runs with Voice of Customer research and training programmes for your staff. You can trust us to get you down the mountain safely.

 

0-20 points

Oops, you’re in danger of losing your bindings or heading off-piste! You need to get onto the beginners’ slopes as soon as you can and we can help you with our CX starter pack. We can carry out a baseline study of your customers so you know immediately what you are doing well and where you need to improve. This is really vital knowledge, especially in these challenging times.

We are the equivalent of the fabulous ski instructor who made your trip something special. Call us.